Thursday, February 25, 2010

Great Leopard Moth

 

This stunning spotted moth is the Great Leopard Moth (Hypercompe scribonia). A very fitting name I might add. Just look at those black circles, are they not reminiscent of a leopard? This moth belongs to the family of moths called Arctiidae, which are the "tiger moths". Great Leopard Moths are found in shrubby areas along roadsides, in gardens and along timbered edges (which is where this one was found) throughout the Eastern United States, west to Texas, north to Michigan and into southern Ontario. I'm not sure how common they are, although I do know they are not as common as many of the other species of tiger moths. In the past 5 years I've only ever seen 2. They are fairly large with a wingspan up to 3 inches. As beautiful as their wings are it is their body that is magnificent. It is a striking combination of bright blue and bright orange.




Females will emit a pheromone (Chemical perfume) to attract males, which are capable of smelling her fragrance from great distances. After mating, the female will lay her eggs on a wide variety of vegetation including Plantain, Maple, Violet, Willow, Dandelion, and Cherry to name but a few. Very likely the female perishes shortly after laying her eggs. The eggs will hatch and the young caterpillars will overwinter in leaf litter. As soon as the temperatures begin to rises the caterpillars will become active and seek food. These little munchers grow rapidly and complete their life cycle in a matter of weeks.
The caterpillars are one of the infamous "wooly bear' caterpillars. Reaching lengths up to 3 inches and covered in dense black hair with a reddish colored skin they are unmistakable.
Most likely the adults do not feed. Instead they consume so much food and nutrients as a caterpillar they merely concentrate on mating and egg laying in their adult stage.
When disturbed these moths have a unique defense mechanism, to deter possible predators they will release a yellowish goo from their eyes. This liquid goo is distasteful to would-be predators and is sure to leave a bad taste in their mouth. This is a trait common to tiger moths. Plus it looks creepy too!
A friend of mine was so enamored of these moths that he was prompted to write a verse about them....I thought I would share it with you.



Great Leopard Moth

If predators will do some screening
And I'm sure they'll give me a bye
In that yellow goop there's a whole new meaning
To the old phrase "evil eye"

By: Richard Lewin

(picture provided by Jkc133---
who found one of these beautiful
moths and is keeping it in a critter keeper. 
She has already laid eggs and the plan to
raise the caterpillars. You can see the eggs attached to the
limb in the critter keeper)

96 comments:

  1. :o) She is quite lovely isn't she? They are without a doubt my favorite moths, right after the large silk moths.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi my son has been taking care of a leopard moth caterpillar it started to cocoon but it never finish he is still fluffy at one end.. My son is so worried that it is dead.. Can you please tell me what happened..

      Delete
    2. Hi my son has been taking care of a leopard moth caterpillar it started to cocoon but it never finish he is still fluffy at one end.. My son is so worried that it is dead.. Can you please tell me what happened..

      Delete
  2. Definitely a beautiful moth. I did not know about tiger moths and the eye secretion. Thanks for the informative post.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm not 100% sure if all tiger moths secrete this ooze from their eyes, but they all taste bad in some from the plants they eat as caterpillars. I've seen other tiger moths secrete an icky substance from their eyes.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Gorgeous little moth! I have a few pictures of a cute little green moth that I see every once in a while... These guys are definitely under appreciated!

    ReplyDelete
  5. We are fortunate to have a large population of many types of moths. Large silk moths are frequent visitors to our farm. I agree moths are definitely under appreciated. What is your green moth? Did you ID it? I'd love to see the photo.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Whoa, very cool! I had no idea thy secreted that stuff (and I will be on the lookout for these this summer, too).

    ReplyDelete
  7. There are so many incredible insects, I am constantly amazed at the diversity I found just by roaming around our farm. Can't wait to see what this spring and summer bring.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Moths are cool. Check out this one that was buzzing around our back porch. Do you know what it is?

    http://spiralmind.info/

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thank you for sharing your wonderful photograph. It is either a Hummingbird Clearwing or a Snowberry Clearwing. They both look very similar and for me they are hard to tell apart. If you go to www.buguide.net and send them your photo they can probably tell you which one it is. :o)

    ReplyDelete
  10. I thought is was a humming bird until it stopped to drink from a flower. I named it a humming bee moth for lack of a better word.

    ReplyDelete
  11. LOL that's funny, but you were almost EXACTLY right.

    ReplyDelete
  12. these moths are tearing my kale and brussel sprouts alive, how can i safely remove and prevent them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. put a netting small enogh around it that they cant get that is really the only safe way

      Delete
    2. i have a giant leapord moth and it lay eggs if u can help me out like tell me how long it takes until the eggs are cattapillers ill send a picture of them. thanks!

      Delete
  13. The only solution that I can come up with that is safe....would be hand removing the caterpillars when you see them. You could also try Sevin Dust, which is a powder that you can sprinkle on the plants, it washes off easily and is not harmful to pets.It will have to be replaced when it rains or after a few days. Some people even place moth balls around their plants. Who knows it may work. I hope some of these ideas are at least a little helpful...good luck

    ReplyDelete
  14. I was cleaning up a old pile of broken brick when I found a caterpiller which I identified as a giant leopard moth. I was interested in this because this caterpiller is quite large. It measures a little over 3 inches in length and is just shy of 1/2 inches round. If everything I have read is correct, this moth is uncommon for Oklahoma. Was wanting to get some feed back if this was a rare find for this area.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Found a catterpiller today, did'nt know what it was. Do now, thanks for the pics.
    Maria
    Parma, Mi.

    ReplyDelete
  16. How long does the Giant Leopard Moth remain in a cocoon? We have one we are watching and feeding. I am thinking of keeping it to watch it eclose.
    robinhawk7@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  17. They hibernate as a caterpillar through winter and then they make a cocoon in spring,and only stay in it for a couple of weeks. Not sure, but we might have two generations of them here.
    I got this information from a friend of mine who has raised them, hope this helps....let me know how it goes.

    ReplyDelete
  18. i found a leopard moth on my door step (nearly stepping on it) it is the most lovely moth iv ever seen. but i had know idea what kind of moth it was so i googled the description of it and that led me here. (0.o' it's watching me type)Now that i know what it is i will take a few pics and release it in my garden (or what used to be a garden) thanks for sharing this information.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I agree anonymous, they really are a beautiful moth. They are definitely my favorite tiger moth. I am so glad you stopped by and I hope to see you around here again.

    ReplyDelete
  20. My daughter received one of these caterpillars as a "pet" back in early October. (I had never seen a woolly bear that wasn't the banded type, so I let her keep this rare all-black one.) We fed it until it sort of half cocooned in December. We put it on a cool windowsill and were waiting for spring...then yesterday I saw she had hatched AND laid many eggs in the jar!

    Unfortunately, the moth wasn't moving so I presumed her dead and broke the news to my little girl. But I left the lid off the jar and found the moth on the kitchen floor the next morning! She is incredibly active at night, although she can only fly in little hops due to her wings not fully forming in the weirdo half-cocoon. It is truly amazing to see such a large, beautiful moth up close, and she seems to like to climb right up onto us. Sad she won't last long, but it sure is a wonderful thing to have in a dreary Iowa winter! Thx for the helpful info.

    ReplyDelete
  21. What a wonderful story, thank you so much for sharing. This is such a great experience for your daughter. It is unfortunate that the moth didn't emerge from her cocoon fully formed, but that does happen on occasion. I've had the same thing happen to butterflies. Are you going to rear the caterpillars that hatch from the eggs?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Thanks! We would rear the caterpillars (now knowing they'll eat so many different plants), but I'm afraid the eggs aren't fertile, since she's been in the jar, and just recently hopping around my kitchen, this whole time. Sounds like there wouldn't be males around for a few months up here.

    ReplyDelete
  23. WOW (newbie here), We're from San Antonio, we also hav one in a bug box and has laid many eggs, like tiny little pearls. They were laid overnight yet one seems to already be hatching- is that possible? I'd love to send some pics, are they easy to submit? jkc133

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi there anonymous, you can send pics to me at MOpiggys@aol.com
    I would love to see them

    ReplyDelete
  25. I added one picture to the post and a short description, thank you for sharing them

    ReplyDelete
  26. hey i was wondering what they ate and how long it takes them to go into a cacoon after they come out from hibernating i found one and am trying to keep it alive

    ReplyDelete
  27. They eat a wide variety of foods including Plantain, Maple, Violet, Willow, Dandelion, and Cherry. There may be other foods that they will eat as well. The caterpillars will feed for about 2 weeks then form their cocoon. They should emerge from the cocoon in about 7 to 10 days. I would say within one month from egg to moth

    ReplyDelete
  28. Hey everyone i have found a leopard moth caterpillar while hiking and i kept it. I am wondering how long it will take to hatch please email me @ danmansour@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi there! We are in Holliston, MA and it is 45 degrees today. We just found a caterpillar curled up in the middle of the back yard. I am assuming the cat found it and brought it here, as it is very early for it to be out and about. There is very little vegetation out as of yet — the hostas are just poking out of the ground, and there are no violets, grass, maple leaves or dandelions. I am going to put him/her in the butterfly habitat and place it out on the back porch. I am adding a cardboard "tent" and vegetation as it becomes available. Like I said, I think this was was found and disturbed by the cats ... so I will give it some time... stay tuned.
    Suzanne In MA: sueadel

    ReplyDelete
  30. Ugh, my leopard moth caterpillar that i rescued slightly more than a month or so ago made his cocoon only a few days after i had been feeding him. he has been in that cocoon ever since. is he dead in there? whats taking him so long? i check on him everyday. his cocoon sits in a jar with holes in the shaded part of my window sill. whats wrong? :(

    ReplyDelete
  31. Taylor I wouldn't worry too much yet. It may take longer than the estimated time posted here. Each individual is different and the circumstances also vary. It could have to do with temperature, or perhaps it just isn't ready to show itself yet :o) I have a luna cocoon I've been watching, last week the cocoon was jumping all over the desk and I thought for sure it would emerge, but no. It is still safely tucked away, and I am exceedingly anxious to see it!

    ReplyDelete
  32. okay, my daughter found a leopard moth caterpillar last weekend and we have kept it. it has munched on a bunch of leaves and even berries believe it or not and now it tucked itself up under some leaves and has made a web-like blanket over itself. is this the cocoon? can i turn it over so that we can actually (hopefully) watch it come out?

    ReplyDelete
  33. MOBugs,
    I'm glad to find your page on the Giant (Great) Leopard Moth. We've raised several and I've documented two of them in cocoon for 23 days. The third one, I didn't mark on the calendar. It seems like it takes FOREVER. I finally wrote an article about our experiences and am linking to your article from http://www.squidoo.com/black-fuzzy-caterpillar. We live in Florida.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Becki it sounds like your caterpillar did indeed form a cocoon. I would wait a few days to make sure it is done doing whatever it needs to do to completely form its cocoon, then I would say it is safe to turn it over.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Paige, so glad to have u visit, this post has generated a lot of interest. Seems numerous people are finding this gorgeous moth. Thanks for sharing the link.

    ReplyDelete
  36. okay, so my moth has finally come out of it's cocoon! however, it looks as though it's wings did not fully form! :( what do i do now? does it eat anything? do i let it go? if it lays eggs will they hatch?

    ReplyDelete
  37. Sometimes that happens. It is unfortunate but there isn't much you can do if it was born deformed. As far as I know they do not eat. If it is a female she may attract a mate if you place her outside. Mating may still take place even with her deformity. If she ends up mating and laying eggs, they should hatch with no problem

    ReplyDelete
  38. well...i was wrong! i guess she just literally came out of the cocoon and her wings were still wrapped up. she is slowly but surely unrolling them out! whew! when should i put her outside? should i just leave her in the container i have her in but with the lid off?

    ReplyDelete
  39. That's great news, glad it is forming normally. I would put her outside later tonight after wings have had time to dry out. If you have a screened box, or critter keeper, or bird cage to put her in that she can't escape from you may be able to watch her "call" in a male with her pheromones.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hey there! We're here in KC MO I was looking up these moths due to the fact that they seem to have taking a liking to our house! There are 6 outside our back door and this morning I found another hanging out on our kitchen counter. Is this common?

    ReplyDelete
  41. I'm not sure if that is common or not, but I would almost be inclined to say "not". Anytime I've encountered these moths it has only been one or two, never large numbers of them. They are truly a beautiful moth too, so perhaps there is something in your area that the caterpillars are using as a host that they really like.

    ReplyDelete
  42. I have to agree, they are very beautiful! I've been living in this house for years and this is the first time I've seen them around here. Maybe they're happy our pool is finally open! They also seem very docile. Every other moth around here freaks out in the usual manner towards our porch lights but, these guys seem to just hang out and even let you touch them and pick them up without the tell-tale eye goo. Sorry to ramble, I just find these moths fascinating since their recent incursion! :D

    ReplyDelete
  43. how do i tell if a caterpillar needs to hibernate or is going to go into a cocoon. we found one of these. he is 2.5 inches long aprox. he was eating good. today he shed his skin and he is staying in one spot. we are in pa. my daughter was hoping to see him turn into a moth, but now i'm afraid if we keep him we will mess up his winter hibernation. any help is greatly appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Generally speaking the caterpillar will stop eating when it is ready to pupate. I don't rear caterpillars so I am not sure how to overwinter this species. Since it is a type of tiger moth it most likely will overwinter in the caterpillar stage, then begin eating in the spring for a short time, then form its cocoon. I would try placing it in a container in a sheltered area outside for the winter. It will most likely need to go through a cold spell in order to complete its lifecycle to cocoon and adulthood. In the spring when the caterpillar begins moving around you will want to feed it until it stops taking food. Then it should go ahead and form a cocoon....what I don't know is if they bury themselves in the soil and make a cocoon, or attach themselves to some surface and form a cocoon.

    ReplyDelete
  45. On Aug. 6, 2011, I found a black fuzzy caterpillar I names "Bear", feasting on my four o'clock plants. I placed a small medicine cup in the bottom of a clear vase with a fluted neck, stuck some of the plant in the water then put in "Bear". A piece of nylon net held in place with a rubber band allowed ventilation. (I wasn't sure if it needed water or got it from the plant.)

    A few weeks later it was inactive for a day then shed its coat and was considerably longer. On Sept. 1 it began creating a large spider web place around it that was attached to the jar and stems of the plant. On Sept. 3 I found a large, shiny black pupae and it had shed again.

    The vase sits in the window sill with diffused light but not sun and the a/c is set at 75. Is it ok to break the webbing and put the pupae in a different container? I have to tell you, I never knew one little critter could 'poop' so much and when it fell in the water - oh my! lol That's why I would like to take it out of the vase.

    My grandson and I would like to know how long before it hatches and what to do for it once it does. The four o'clocks are eaten up and I will soon cut them to the ground for the winter.

    ReplyDelete
  46. He emerged! I may have been mistaken about the date he made the pupae. He emerged from the pupae this morning which would be 24 days. If his lower body had not been slowly moving like breathing I would have thought he was dead. Occasionally he stretches his legs or moves a little bit. Wikipedia says the male has a yellow stripe down the body and it is a beautiful golden yellow stripe that is easy to see on "Bear". lol He even had a golden tear when I first found him in the vase.

    This is so exciting and I can't wait until my grandson gets out of school today.

    By the way we live in the county with Tampa, FL. Should we put leaves in the cage. I think I will just to see what happens.

    ReplyDelete
  47. I found one of these little guys Nov 26. I live in North FL and I really want to try to wake him up from hibernating (an entomology website said to keep them in a cooler and gave a temp range so he's set to nap for the winter already) during the most opportune time for him to mate. I've been trying to find when that is for NE FL with no luck whatsoever. "Spring" doesn't really leave him with much of a chance given the short time they have to mate and spring consisting of 12 wks. Any idea where I can find this info???
    Violet.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Anonymous, I am sorry, but I am just not familiar enough with FL climate to tell u when that would be. Even with a narrow window of twelve weeks if you have a female she will attract a mate. I will ask some of my ento. friends and see if they have any idea what would work best.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Shelley,
    The thing about Florida weather in Spring and Fall is that it's Bipolar. One day you're at the beach, and the next day you're building a fire for the evening.

    I'm assuming the species in the wild has "evolved" so to speak to awaken and mate during the stabilization of the Floridian weather. (This is just an educated guess since those that hibernate until the cold days are gone for good have mated and layed eggs that survived and continued the cycle. But I could be way off)

    I guess if I knew either the FL timeline for them OR a temp. range that encourages them to wake up, feed, pupate, and mate I could maybe guesstimate and keep up with the forecast?

    Thanks for any help!

    Violet.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Hey, we found a black cocoon that we have identified as a giant leopard moth cocoon. However, we found it in the beginnings of winter, and he isn't a caterpillar, he's a cocoon. I'm slightly worried hes dead, but we did have a week long cold spell here before the weather warmed back up to the 50 range. It's actually 54 degrees here, Christmas morning. (wierd weather) I was wondering if the caterpillar may have been fooled into thinking that it's spring already? If so, any ideas what I should do for him?

    ReplyDelete
  51. I caught one with out touching it, now what do I do?

    ReplyDelete
  52. I'm not sure what you are asking me. Are you wanting to keep it and try to get eggs from it? I would say this time of year the best thing to do would be to just let it go.

    ReplyDelete
  53. I live in FL and have found what I identified as a giant leopard moth caterpillar. He was quite small when we found him in late March (less than an inch) and has since shed his skin three times (most recent was last night) and has grown considerably since then (he is quite "fluffy" now and probably about 3 inches long when he is all stretched out). We have kept him and observed him for well over a month now, and wondering how long it generally takes for them to pupate? He will be inactive for a couple of days, and we will get excited that he might be getting ready to "do his thing" but every time he has just shed his skin (which is still fascinating). We are getting quite attached to him after having him so long! I assume they run on some kind of internal clock (any one who lives here can tell you the weather is quite unpredictable, and we didn't have much of a "winter" for him to hibernate during). Could his timing be off? Just seems to be taking an awful long time.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I came across one of these beauties for the first time in my life today, I never knew they existed. It is absolutely gorgeous! I kept it and played with it for a few hours before letting it go. It was a really big one too, it had a little weight to it. I hope to see more of them in the future!

    ReplyDelete
  55. I too found this month just a few days ago in my kitchen and a few days later was in a container, very lethargic, and started laying eggs, I thought it had die a few days ago but every time I check the container I find there is more eggs in it! So as of today is still alive but not moving, but I know is still alive. Now what do I do with the eggs? How long do they take to hatch? I have no idea what to do, where to put the eggs... any help would be greatly appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  56. My boyfriend and I recently bought a house in missouri and we have seen two of these moths. We were curious about it because when we first noticed it, its wings were lifted up much like a butterfly would do. When we came back later to look again, its wings had layed down. Very beautiful. We captured a few pictures but I didn't notice any blue or orange on its body.

    ReplyDelete
  57. CS June 6, 2012
    Found this beautiful moth and have it in our nice butterfly house....
    Looking forward to seeing what will happen next

    ReplyDelete
  58. I just took pictures of two of these moths mating! They were on the front of my house, right next to the front door so of course I couldn't miss them! Upon closer examination I realized there were two and hurried to get my camera. After I snapped some shots I hopped online to figure out what type of moth they were...and that led me to this blog! I would be happy to share the pictures with you if you want!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would love to see your pictures. You can send them to my email at MOpiggys@aol.com

      Delete
  59. My daughter & I just found one this morning in the parking lot of our grocery store. I had never seen anything like it! Fortunately I took a picture of it so that I could do some investigating. I was thrilled to find out what it was, but the most amazing thing I learned is that they are not typically found in northwest Iowa. Do you know if their habitat range is changing?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found this moth in Poland. is it possible? I do not have any information about this species.

      Delete
    2. I am not sure if this moth is native to Poland, but I would say it is definitely possible for it to be there. With so many people traveling these days it could have ended up there accidentally.

      Delete
  60. I just found one tonight crawling on the cement, first time ever seeing one...I am going to try and let him do his thing
    Being a photographer I can't wait to see this beautiful moth and will record everything
    I am wondering, I gave him maple leaves, a milkweed, and another kind of leaf, I cant find any dandylion's, will this be good for him/her
    Am I supposed to keep him in a critter cage in the garage all winter now. Is he going to be a cocoon all winter and emerge in the Spring?
    Thanks,
    Peaches from Wisconsin

    ReplyDelete
  61. I found this dark black fuzz ball on my floor a few days ago. It was creepy and scary looking. it was so dense in fur that I thought it was some other type of critter like a dead mouse! I never seen one before and when I identified it as a giant leopard moth I was so excited that I kept it hoping to raise it then release it to mate. So they are native to long island, ny region? Seriously the coolest looking catapillar I ever seen around here!

    ReplyDelete
  62. I was wondering if you know the life span and the predators of the moth?

    ReplyDelete
  63. I've had a leopard moth caterpillar for almost two months and its still in the caterpillar phase...is this normal? And when can I expect it to cocoon?

    ReplyDelete
  64. I've had a leopard moth caterpillar for almost two months and its still in the caterpillar phase...is this normal? And when can I expect it to cocoon?

    ReplyDelete
  65. I live in central Alabama. My husband found a great leopard moth caterpillar climbing one of the homes which was under construction on his job sight in December. Knowing it would be crushed by the machinery he brought it home. At the time it was every bit of three inches long. We did our research and kept it in a cool place with vegetation. We have had it almost a month now and it has never shed its skin. It is now in the middle of creating its cocoon. I had it in a large container with vegetation and sticks for it to climb on and cocoon but it chose to dig a hole and web itself in. Now it is forming a cocoon. I am afraid it is cocooning to soon. Winter usually arrives in January here. What should I do at this point? What can I expect from here?

    ReplyDelete
  66. I'm from South Carolina, found one around 1/20/13 fed her for about ten days...alot of eating and pooping, then she started building a cocoon around 1/30 inside of a mason jar. She spun a beautiful orange web then squeezed out of her skin to form her cocoon. I eventually took her out of the web and jar, and put her into a very large container with netting over the top eagerly awaiting her transformation. Tonight it happened, 28 days later she emerged a Giant Leopard Moth. I'm so glad I waited it out and had apparenly done all the right things to this point, however it's a bit too chilly to set her free outside. I hope she can hang on for a few days till the day temp is over 50 degrees. Wish me luck everyone!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for sharing your story. I hope she makes it too. I know this weather has been so weird all over the Country. We've been in the middle of a blizzard for the past 5 days. I do wish you luck and let me know how it turns out.

      Delete
    2. Thanks Shelly,
      Well I've had her now for 5 days inside a mesh pop-up hamper, still waiting for the temp to rise and tomorrow should be the day. She has been steadily laying eggs all over. I've read about these moths mating and wondered if you think her eggs would survive/or be fertile and what would be the best way to place them outside tomorrow when I let her go...She has never attempted to fly in the past 5 days, is this common? Is there anything else I should do for her? Thanks

      Delete
  67. So I found one of these and gave it a good home with fresh leaves and stick and it ate like crazy and pooped like crazy for about a week, but this morning I came to look at him and his butt had fallen off?? Basically like 1/4 of his rear abdomen just was sitting in the bottom and he was crawling around just fine it seemed. Is this normal, I can't find this happening to anyone else online. What happened? He seems fine besides this lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It sounds like he shed or molted his skin. This means he is eating and growing. The piece left behind in the container is his shed skin.

      Delete
  68. I live in San Antonio, and have noticed the giant leopard moth caterpillar chowing down on my Mexican Flame Vine. Not the leaves, the flowers!

    ReplyDelete
  69. Great info! I'm in the Rio Grande Valley (U.S./Mex border) & saw 4 of these caterpillars crawling around eaves of the house last night. I was a little creeped out by these big fuzzy black things, but thanks to your informative blog I've learned that I can now look forward to some beautiful moths!

    ReplyDelete
  70. On April 15, 2013 I found a all Black fuzzy caterpillar with red stripes on the belly, does anyone know what kind this is? After Two weeks it attached itself to the top of the habitat I thought it was dead I noticed a rusty colored web around it. Then a week later it looked like it had shed its fur, and an orange shell had came out, but now that shell is black but there is still hair at the other end of it. Now its been over a week and its still like this is this the cocoon, is it normal and how long is this going to take? Getting worried.

    ReplyDelete
  71. finally the tiger moth is here, but my question is can I keep it, does it eat anything and what are my chances if I put the container outside and it calls for a mate. Will I be able to capture another one. I have to say I am enjoying this whole experience.

    ReplyDelete
  72. ok my caterpillar is now a beautiful giant leopard moth, but I want to keep it. But what do I feed it and will it survive and how do I find another one so they can mate. Janine

    ReplyDelete
  73. My Leopard moth seems weak, haven't gotten a response from my previous questions getting concerned now.

    ReplyDelete
  74. The two giant leopard moths I saw yesterday were some of the most stunning pieces of Art that I have ever seen. Thanks Thrice to the artist. Blue legs!

    ReplyDelete
  75. Jw...wat is the stinger looking thing coming out of the moths butt? Lol i found an injured one today on my porch and while looking at it,noticed this...

    ReplyDelete
  76. Just saw one of these this morning. Was watering and flushed it out of my baby sun rose. That must be what it has been eating. I would like to "raise" it, but we are going on vacation soon. Hope to see the moth later. From New Port Richey FL.

    ReplyDelete
  77. A moth that looks just like the giant leopard moth just spent 2 days laying eggs on my kitchen window. I actually watched some eggs being laid, very interesting entertainment while washing the dishes. My daughter is worried and wants to move them, I'm pretty sure they're stuck and I'm not moving them, but I'm concerned about them hatching on my window too. I'd like to place some food nearby if anyone has any leaf suggestions. It's fall here, and I'm in Northern California. And maybe I have the wrong moth - I'm happy to share a photo with anyone who would like to compare.

    ReplyDelete
  78. I think I woke one up from it's hibernation.my older brother found one in the garage and thought it was dead and when he poked it.it started to move so we poked it some more and now it's rolling all over the floor.Should we just let it clam down and go back to sleep.

    ReplyDelete
  79. Hi. I hope you can help me. My sister and I a leopard moth caterpillar, and we kept it in an empty soda bottle. We had a stick in there for her to make a cocoon on but she made one in a bunch of leaves. When she came out she left little tiny green dots. Are they eggs?
    The next night we let her outside, putting her on a pine tree. Her womgs were all crumpled and brown at the ends. Whats wrong with her? Shd wouldn't fly and the next mornimg she was still on the tree witg more green egg things. Why won't she fly?

    ReplyDelete
  80. I usually raise Monarch butterflies from an egg, but I am interested in raising moths. The giant Leopard Moth seems very beautiful and I would love to raise them one year. This information has been very useful, but I'm still not sure where to start with raising them. Could I get some info?

    ReplyDelete
  81. Are they poisonous to feed my chameleon with one that I found in my garden?

    ReplyDelete
  82. Sept 24,2015 I found this beautiful Giant Leopard Moth on my front porch in Plano, TX thinking it was dead I bought it in the house to see what happens to her!! She is in a box with a leaf & stem!!!

    ReplyDelete
  83. I found a moth on the pavement, for fear of it being trodden on I bought it home. I think it's a leopard moth, but not 100% sure. It looks like some of the moth dust has come off of the wing tips. I've placed it on my peace lily. Is there anyone that I could email the photo too, to confirm what it is and what to do to help it. I live in Kent in the UK. Thanks in advance. Ruth

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can email your picture(s) to MOpiggys@aol.com. I would be happy to look at them and see what your moth may be.

      Delete